My Photography & Camera Technology | Light

10th November 2015
Throughout my whole life I have had an interest in photography. I am the youngest and only girl in my family (I have three older brothers!); my youngest of my elder brothers teases me that there are no baby photos of him, yet tons of baby photos of me! I guess my parents decided that they wanted to document their one and only girl in photography. My dad owned a Polaroid Instant camera and my mum a Kodak film camera. I remember being taught how to load film and take photos from an early age.



I remember holiday snap shots and trips to the Margate and other seaside days out and excitedly handing over the roll of film to the pharmacy and the anticipation of getting the photos back a few days later.

As I got older I still enjoyed photography and started using those disposable film cameras or borrowing a compact digital camera to use, but it was just something I did on special occasions like birthdays, holidays, a music concert, etc. During this time my passion was music and I had various jobs and projects that meant I didn’t realise my passion for photography until summer 2009.





A friend of mine, Andreas Wheeler was already a photographer and I expressed an interest in learning to master the basics of a DSLR camera, from having used those small cameras for snapshot photos on automatic settings. Andreas loaned me a spare Sigma SD14 and a couple lenses and we would meet on weekends and go for photo walks around London as he taught me about shutter speed, aperture, ISO, etc. I remember the Sigma being big, heavy and clunky, but the quality of images was decent. I remember walking for hours and hours, taking photos of everything that caught my eye on our walks. I guess at that stage of learning, I had no real idea what direction my photography would take. I was so hooked on taking photos that I was going out with the camera 3-4 times a week! Any opportunity I could get after work mid week and on weekends.





After about 3 months with the sigma, going out day and night, taking photos of anything and everything, architecture, scenery, objects, experimenting with slow shutter speed shots and different styles of photography. Looking back I can see my images definitely started to clearly focus more and more on people. I was already a ‘people watcher’ but the camera probably magnified this! Candid portraits and moments that I thought captured something interesting. Of course at the time of taking photos of random strangers in the street, I had not even heard of the term ‘street photography’. It was only after posting one particular photo on Flickr, that someone commented that the image reminded him of Henri Cartier-Bresson, and at the time I was thinking ‘who?’! So Googled the name, saw the photos Cartier-Bresson took and it was like I had just uncovered a gold mine of eye candy!! I think that was the day everything changed and I knew this was the genre I wanted to get into and learn more about.





Fast-forward about 6 months, I had since mastered my basic camera settings and had discovered street photography. The Sigma had done its job initially, but I guess I had outgrown it. For my street photography walks now, I knew I wanted a camera much smaller, lighter and faster to capture moments quicker and more discreetly, so I got myself a Canon Powershot G11, which at the time was great and helped me get many shots I am proud off.





About a year later, I decided that I needed something a bit more powerful and with better megapixels and opted for a Canon 60D DSLR with an EF-S17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM lens and a 50mm prime lens. Whilst it was a more modern DSLR than the Sigma and the image quality was great, it had its little flaws like being slow to auto focus in low light and a few other little niggles that didn’t make it the most enjoyable camera for street photography.





Around this time, I also just started to experiment with my new iPhone and liked the fact it was a lot more portable and I felt a lot more invisible to get even closer to my subjects. I knew that smaller bodied cameras that had the power and the qualities of that of a DSLR and lenses and was the way forward.

By around 2011, the ‘mirror-less’ camera new technology was available. I thought to myself I don’t want to have to keep changing cameras too frequently, so I made a list of all the features I wanted my next camera to have and from experience the flaws I wanted to avoid before I decided on my next camera purchase. At the time, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G3 ticked all the boxes and was like a godsend to me especially with 20mm, 25mm & 45mm Olympus M.Zuiko prime lenses that I have for it. So much so I still use it for most of my street photography, but also for any commissioned work or projects.





In 2013 I decided to go even smaller and acquired a Sony RX100 as a back up camera, which fits into the palm of my hand and easily slips into my pocket when I want to go for a wander with something lighter and even more portable.

Of course new technology is constantly evolving, and as you grow as a photographer, you will want to continually upgrade to newer cameras and features that meet your needs and demands. Whether in speed, ease of use, image quality and/or portability. The most recent new technology I’ve read about is the LIGHT L16, a NEW CAMERA TECHNOLOGY that integrates 16 lenses onto one slim, streamlined camera body that boasts DSLR quality. Imagine having a camera body, 3 fast prime lenses fit right into your pocket. With up to 52 megapixel resolution, this camera is going to be a game changer.








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