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The 7 Essential Rules of Street Photography - Article
12th June 2017 - 0 comments


The 7 Essential Rules of Street Photography

Check out a new article on Photographytalk.com website, offering some helpful beginner street photography tips! I was asked to contribute some street photography 'wisdom' to the article which I hope you find useful. Happy shooting!
Why you should never delete your photos
20th May 2016 - 0 comments


A rainy day photograph I found in the 'Vaults' today. This was taken in Soho, London September 2015. I was out on a photo walk, one of the evenings after some heavy downpour in the UK that flooded most of the country. I took a few shots from this Soho location, but at the time, I wasn't sure which shot from the series was my overall favourite. A few months on, it turns out its this one I like the best. The moral of this story is never delete the photos from your camera, no matter how rubbish you think it looks at the time. Even when you get home and look at them on your big screen monitor and you are still unsure about what to keep and what to delete, for whatever reason.

If you are not sure about a shot, store it away - keep it, back it up somewhere. There are so many freebie 'cloud storage' services available if you don't have a USB stick drive, a portable hard drive to copy your image files to. I'm quite religious with my backups now after almost losing ALL of my original files stored on a failing hard drive.

After every photo walk I do, I create & name a new folder on my Mac with the date and location of the shoot for my reference (i.e 20 May 2016 - Soho). As I review the photos from that shoot, I save the usable files (one high res & one low res) in that folder, this then gets auto backed up to my portable hard drive via Time Machine, and then this is copied to my Google Drive cloud storage area, so if both my Mac and portable drive go up in flames, I still have my cloud copies! Yes I'm a tad organised, but it is for very good reason. I'm not just overly OCD!

If like myself, you make and sell prints of your work, you need to be able to find that file for processing. I will get a print enquiry from someone about a photo that I shared on one of my social media pages. If you don't know, some of my shared street photography images date back to 2009. That's over 7 years worth of photos, that's tens of thousands of images I need to easily access and find that high res version of a specific file efficiently. Thinking back to before I had this filing system, it was virtually impossible to find image files I was looking for. I just randomly saved my images to some folder or just threw them on the Mac desktop. But now I have my 'vault', it is so much more simple to find and grab any file when I need it, especially when I have a deadline to send an image file to the printing lab. It just makes my life a whole lot easier.

Another reason I keep my files, is every so often I review a batch of older images that I've taken. They that didn't make the original cut for whatever reason and occasionally find an image I really like from that bunch, and think why didn't I notice this one before. It could be for one or a number of reasons: a) I didn't think it was visually strong enough or b) I wasn't sure it was the strongest in the series I took or even c) maybe it was not perfect in your mind, but your style may have changed or maybe now you just don't mind quirky imperfections! d) other. Every photographer should have a 'vault', a personal collection, containing your body of work that you can return to, dip into, review, rework, get inspiration from.

What have I learnt from this? Simply taking a step back from my own photos, if that's a week, a month, or a year; disconnecting myself emotionally from my images, and revisiting them from almost 'another persons' point of view, can make you see them completely differently. I have occasionally found a few gems such as this one, that I had completely forgotten that actually ended up growing on me!

This image is available as a photographic print here.