Mayfair Light Chasing - London Street Photography

14th October 2015
For the past few weeks, I have been organising a mid-week, after work photo walk with my Meetup group We Shoot People. Yesterday I took group members to Mayfair, central London to explore night street shooting. As you know if you follow my stuff, I am a 'light chaser' and so nighttime street photography is fun but challenging and I love to utilise the given light available to make creative street images. This style usually works best when the image is processed in black and white to give a noir feeling to a shot.


© Linda Wisdom

It was fun showing the attendees my favourite locations and inspiring them to experiment and opening their eyes just a little. Many first time street photographers are more used to holiday 'snap shot' type images or understand street photography to mean just getting street portraits during day light hours. A few of the attendees expressed that they had never come out for a night street photography event, so I felt like I was really showing them a whole new world. Once I gave them a few pointers and helped them optimise their camera settings to accommodate the lower light, they were off shooting enthusiastically with their newfound creative way of looking at the world at night.


© Katherine

Many thanks for a pleasant evening. Thanks for your tips and showing us around some great night time shooting spots. Angelo Gifford

During the walk through some back streets, I stopped to take some photos of a smooth concrete wall that immediately caught my attention because of the moving car lights reflecting shadows and silhouettes of people walking past and some stationary bicycles. One of the attendees said that they would have walked right past and wouldn't have thought to take a photo. Another member expressed frustration in not seeing 'interesting' stuff, which is a common query that I get enquiries about very often.

There are many tips and tricks that I teach through my 1-2-1 street photography workshops, which can help you train your eyes to start to see more opportunities, add dynamic to your compositions, help you think creatively and make stronger photos. The most important part of that tuition, is going out with your camera as often as possible and practicing as much as you can what you have learnt. Over a matter of time, trials and errors you WILL start to see things around you in a whole new light.



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